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By Kelly Mclaughlin For Mailonline 10:21 GMT 22 Jan 2017, updated 10:21 GMT 22 Jan 2017.
Latest From MailOnline.
Elsa Salama – who will be ten years old in February – vanished in December 2011 Her father, Tamer Salama, took her from her mother, Naomi Button, while all three were visiting Egypt Button hasn’t seen Elsa since and launched family court action to get her back A judge heard that Elsa is living with Mr Salama’s mother in Cairo, Egypt Mr Salama says Elsa is under the control of his relatives in Egypt He said the youngster is now 3,500 miles from the UK and beyond his control.
An Egyptian former teacher who took his daughter from her English mother five years ago has told a judge the youngster is now 3,500 miles from the UK and beyond his control.
Elsa Salama – who will be ten years old in February – vanished in December 2011 after her father Tamer Salama took her from her mother Naomi Button while all three were visiting Egypt, judges have heard.
Ms Button, a leadership consultant in her 40s from Leeds who was once married to Mr Salama, has not seen Elsa since and has launched family court action in England in the hope of getting her back.
Mr Salama – who lives in Manchester and has lived in Nottingham and Southampton – was jailed in January 2012 for breaching judges’ orders to arrange Elsa’s return to England or to reveal where she was.
He was released in December 2013 after a judge ruled that continuing to keep him in prison was no longer proportionate or justifiable.
Mr Justice Baker, the judge currently overseeing the litigation at hearings in the Family Division of the High Court in London, has heard that Elsa is living with Mr Salama’s mother in Cairo.
And Mr Salama, who is also in his 40s, says Elsa is under the control of his relatives in Egypt.
‘The people who are in control are 3,500 miles away,’ Mr Salama told Mr Justice Baker at the latest hearing on Friday. ‘The family is in control.’
He added: ‘The family is not prepared to do anything (Elsa) is not willing to do.’
As of November, Ms Button had been in contact with her daughter via Skype – but not recently.
Elsa disappeared on December 27, 2011, after her parents, who had separated, took her on holiday to Sharm el-Sheikh to visit Salama’s family. Salama sneaked her out of their apartment and texted Ms Button to demand she sign a contract giving up all parental responsibilities.
Ms Button went to the British Embassy and the local police for help but was forced to return to the UK to get legal advice.
Meanwhile, Mr Salama also returned to England, where he had been training in Southampton to be a physics teacher.
He was detained by police and in January 2012 was jailed for contempt of court as he refused to reveal where he is hiding his daughter.
Ms Button met Mr Salama when he was working at an international school in Sharm el-Sheikh in 2005. The couple married in Egypt in 2006 and moved to England in 2007 following Elsa’s birth.
They separated in 2009 but continued to live together in the family home in Leeds for Elsa’s sake until Salama began a teacher training degree in August 2010.
Ms Button agreed in 2011 to go on holiday with him to Egypt so Elsa could see her grandparents.
While they were there, she asked him to consider a divorce and admitted she had struck up a relationship with an ex-boyfriend. Furious, Mr Salama tried to make her give up Elsa by accusing her of adultery – a criminal offence in Egypt.
Mr Salama has failed in a bid to bar journalists from reporting the latest stage of litigation.
He says detail aired at private family court hearings should remain private.
He has complained that previous media coverage has been partisan and has not given his side of the story.
But Mr Justice Baker says the case has previously been reported as a result of Mr Salama being jailed for contempt at a public hearing.
He said judges had made enormous efforts to reunite Elsa with her mother in recent years – and he said the media had assisted.
The judge added that any view the case was in the public domain and that the latest stage of the litigation can be reported.
ABC’s striking ‘American Crime’ returns with heavy tales of human exploitation.
Regina King returns as Kimara Walters, a social worker losing faith in her ability to help teenage prostitutes, in ABC’s “American Crime.” (Nicole Wilder/ABC)
Creator John Ridley’s superb anthology drama “American Crime,” which returns for a third season Sunday on ABC, has been a minor miracle for broadcast network television. It’s that rare show that strides into difficult and even morose subject matter without flinching or dressing it up. It favors empathy over momentum and ambiguity over conclusion. Even though its story arcs occasionally drift, the show takes us on an effectively written and thoughtfully performed journey.
“American Crime” is also never about just one theme. Season 1, about a home-invasion murder, presented itself as a study of the prejudices that prevent criminal justice, but it was just as much about how communities collapse in the same way that some families do. Season 2, about a rape involving athletes at a private high school, was predominantly a study in class divide but left a deeper impression as a story about the lingering damage of bias and gossip. In both cases, the crimes in “American Crime” were less about crime than about travesties and double standards — the inexorably punitive weight of society’s many ills.

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